Celebrating Shakespeare at OU

PaintingOn this day set aside to recognize the birth of William Shakespeare (1564-1616), we have much to celebrate on the OU campus relating to Shakespeare and his times.

In February we learned that the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History was selected as the Oklahoma site for the traveling exhibition First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare.

Today, it was announced that the First Folio will be on display at the Sam Noble Museum in early 2016.

ShakTP copy

The First Folio is the first printed collection of Shakespeare’s plays (published in 1623). The copy that will be on display in Oklahoma is one of only 233 surviving copies of this significant work. The traveling exhibit program is the result of a partnership between the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Cincinnati Museum Center, and the American Library Association.

The nationwide tour of copies of the First Folio commemorates the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. For the OU campus, it comes at a propitious time: throughout 2015 and 2016 we will be immersed in the world of the 16th and 17th centuries, through engagement with exhibits and programs for Galileo’s World.

Pictured here is OU’s copy of the Second Folio, published in 1632. It is one of the many treasures held in the John and Mary Nichols Rare Books and Special Collections, and will be on display in Galileo’s World.

 

Shakespeare and OU’s Special Collections

While 2016 is the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, it was just last year – 2014 -that we recognized the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth.  We did this with a display of books from the History of Science Collections and the John and Mary Nichols Collection.

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Click here to download a copy of the exhibit brochure, with pages rotated 180 degrees for more convenient printing on some printers.  Also, see the exhibit page.

Shakespeare at OU

Beyond books, other commemorations of Shakespeare can be found in and around Bizzell Library. This includes the portrait shown above (outside the Great Reading Room), and the bench on the east side of the building.

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And of course, numerous OU Faculty across campus are engaged in the study of Shakespeare and/or his times, not only from the Department of English, but also from Classics and Letters, History, History of Science, and Modern Languages.  A gathering point for many of these scholars is the Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies. Faculty across campus and across the disciplines are associated with the Center.

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“The Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies at the University of Oklahoma promotes the study of the period in Western history that saw the development of such major components of modern life as parliamentary democracy, the nation-state, English and other modern languages, printing, Islam, global exploration, heliocentric astronomy, romantic love–and the universities in which we research and teach all these subjects. Some thirty-five faculty at OU contribute to the study of these and many other facets of the Middle Ages and Renaissance.”

Doing Research with Books from OU’s 5th-Floor Special Collections 

While tours and class visits are not possible as we undergo renovation on the 5th floor of Bizzell Library in preparation for the Galileo’s World Exhibit (scheduled for the 2015-16 academic year), researchers continue to have individual access to our books and materials from our four special collection libraries: Bass, Bizzell Bible, History of Science, and John and Mary Nichols. For a glimpse into the books in these collections, see these guides to past exhibits: Crossing Cultures, Living Library (iBooks exhibit) and our online galleries. Use Discover Local, the online catalog, to search for items in the collections.

For information on our public reading room services, see 4th Floor Reading Room page and Reading Room Handout. See the Collections blog for more information on resources, activities, and events relating to OU’s 5th floor special collection libraries.

Please contact the staff for assistance (405) 325-2741. Or contact us:

Posted in Class aids, Exhibits and events, Featured book, In the news, Learning resources, Manuscripts, archives, photos, Research tips, Uncategorized

Teaching with Galileo’s World Exhibit, 2015-16

Looking for opportunities to engage students in the classroom and beyond?

Want to use primary source materials to promote student learning and research?

gw-logoConsider using the Galileo’s World Exhibit, on display in Bizzell Library and partner sites (and online) throughout the 2015-2016 academic year.

OU Faculty, Graduate Students, and Staff are welcome to attend our upcoming information sessions on  Teaching with Galileo’s World.   

Drop in for a chat. Come and go as you please.

Learn about the exhibit, discuss possibilities for students projects, and brainstorm ways of using the exhibit to meet your goals for teaching – whether in the humanities, sciences, fine arts, engineering, or other areas.

WHERE:                 Digital Scholarship Laboratory, Bizzell Library BLLL 121A

TIMES:                   Monday-Friday,  11:30-1:30                                                             

DATES:                   April 27-May 1 (last week of classes) 

                                   May 4- May 8 (finals week)

HOST:                     JoAnn Palmeri, History of Science Collections 

 Bacon-1640-fp copy 2 Cunitz-1650-000-tp2 copy 2Unknown artist

 

Fifth Floor Renovations

The 5th floor is currently undergoing renovation in preparation for the upcoming Galileo’s World Exhibit. Although class visits are not possible in the interim, students and faculty are still welcome to use Collections materials for their research. Be sure to visit our new Reading Room location – Room 414 Bizzell West (open Monday-Friday 9-4:45pm/325-2760). Info on 4th Floor Services

More Information

If you can’t make these sessions but want to learn more about using Special Collections materials in support of teaching and research,  please contact JoAnn Palmeri, Research Coordinator, History of Science Collections/Acting Curator, John and Mary Nichols Collection, /325-2741, palmerij@ou.edu. And watch this blog for news and updates about resources and services relating to Bizzell’s 5th floor Special Collections.

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For more on Galileo’s World see:

Finding Materials in the Collections

See these guides for help finding materials in the History of Science Collections: http://guides.ou.edu/hosresourceshttp://guides.ou.edu/hossearching, and http://guides.ou.edu/fifthfloorexhibits. Go to the Crossing Cultures Exhibit page on the exhibit guide to get a feel for the scope – in time, geography, language, and genre – of materials held in OU’s 5th floor collections.

For help with primary source materials in history (digital or print) accessible through OU Libraries, please consult Laurie Scrivener, History Librarian and Primary Research Projects Specialist/325-1903, lscrivener@ou.edu and Jackie Reese, Western History Collections Librarian/325-3641, jdslater@ou.edu and Kristina Southwell, Associate Curator, Western History Collections/325-3641, klsouthwell@ou.edu. Additional Subject Liaisons at OU Libraries are listed here.

Posted in Finding aids

46 Years Ago Today: A Galileo-Inspired Banquet at OU’s Symposium in the History of Science

April1969As we prepare to launch a major exhibition in August, 2015, entitled Galileo’s Worldwe are also looking back to our history. This week marks a notable anniversary for History of Science at the University of Oklahoma. Forty-six years ago (April 8-12, 1969) the University of Oklahoma hosted a Symposium in the History of Science, cosponsored by the Midwest Junto for the History of Science and the Society of the History of Technology.

Speakers and Commentators for the event included: Lawrence Badash, Marshall Clagett, William Coleman, John C. Greene, Edward Grant, Thomas L. Hankins, John E. Murdoch, Rhoda Rappaport, Martin J. S. Rudwick, Richard S. Westfall, and David B. Wilson.

 

History of Science Collections Curator and Professor Duane H. D. Roller edited the proceedings (Perspectives in the History of Science and Technology, 1971).

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A banquet for participants of the Symposium was held on April 11, 1969. The program for the banquet featured images of books by Galileo held in the History of Science Collections.

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Works by Galileo held in the History of Science Collections are a core feature of the upcoming Galileo’s World exhibit, opening at Bizzell Memorial Library and partner sites beginning in August 2015.

gw-logoFor more on Galileo’s World see:

 

As the exhibition year unfolds, watch for more posts as we continue to dig into the archives and rediscover aspects of the history of the Collections and the Department.

* * * * * *

For  information on visiting the History of Science Collections see Contact Us – Visit; also see the website of the Department of the History of Science

 

 

Rendering of new lobby for the History of Science Collections, coming summer 2015
Coming soon!

Posted in In the news

Medieval Times

Ulyssess Aldrovandi, Serpentum, et Draconum Historiae (Bolognia, 1640)Norman’s annual Medieval Fair follows fast on the heels of the Spring Equinox.

So it seems fitting to focus on all things medieval in Norman and at the University. This includes showcasing rare books from OU’s History of Science Collections for a glimpse into how medieval scholars viewed their world.

Getting Medieval in Norman, OK

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Every year since 1977, The Medieval Fair has provided one of the largest gatherings of musicians, artisans, and performers to Norman, Oklahoma. Not only is admission free but families and children of all ages flock to Reeves Park to partake in a flashback to the Medieval period (the 5th-15th centuries).

The Medieval Fair of Norman, along with the University of Oklahoma, offers a free lecture series co-sponsored by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and hosted at the Norman Public Library, 225 N. Webster, 6:30pm-7:30pm. The next presentation is on April 17, 2015, by Dr. David Anderson, of the Department of English at OU. He will speak on “How Shakespeare’s Romans Die: The Ethics of Suicide in Julius Caesar.”

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“The Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies at the University of Oklahoma promotes the study of the period in Western history that saw the development of such major components of modern life as parliamentary democracy, the nation-state, English and other modern languages, printing, Islam, global exploration, heliocentric astronomy, romantic love–and the universities in which we research and teach all these subjects.Some thirty-five faculty at OU contribute to the study of these and many other facets of the Middle Ages and Renaissance.”  Faculty across campus and across the disciplines are associated with the Center.

 

Manuscripts in the Special Collections

While the Special collections on the 5th floor of Bizzell Library (Bass Business History, Bizzell Bible, History of Science, and the John and Mary Nichols Collection)  are comprised predominantly of printed books, these collections also include manuscript materials.

Music copy

Many 16th and 17th-century printed books in the History of Science Collections are bound with music manuscripts from the medieval period.  Other books have manuscript text as part of their front and back covers. Many books have handwritten notes and marginalia sprinkled throughout the text. Much of this awaits transcription and study.

In addition to manuscript materials within printed books, the 5th floor collections also contain manuscript (handwritten) books.  Included among these are a 15th century Book of Hours.

 

Early Modern Editions of Medieval Works

The collections holdings in early printed books include editions of the works of medieval authors as well as the works of earlier authors widely read in this period.

Among the incunabula held by the Collections (books printed before 1500) are works by these authors:

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Hrabanus Maurus,  1467

 Pietro Crescenzi, Ruralium commodorum (Augsburg, 1471)Crescenzi-1471-1Book3 copy

Pietro de’ Crescenzi,  1471

DunsScotus-1481 copyJohn Duns Scotus, Scriptum super tertio sententiarum (Venice, 1481)

John Duns Scotus, 1481

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Peter Lombard, 1487

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Sacrobosco, 1488

Capella Martianus, De nuptiis philologiae et Mercurii (Vicentiae, 1499)Capella Martianus, De nuptiis philologiae et Mercurii (Vicentiae, 1499)

Martianus Capella, 1499

 Among the holdings of medieval authors in the History of Science Collections, are these 16th-century editions of works by Albert the Great and Hildegard of Bingen.

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Albert the Great, 1518

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Saint Hildegard, 1533

 Materials for the Study of the History of Science, Technology & Medicine 

In addition to rare books and primary source materials, the History of Science Collections has significant holdings in non-rare materials: modern scholarly works, critical editions and facsimiles, introductory texts, and reference books.

The following is a select list of works relevant to the study of science, technology, the environment and medicine in the medieval period, available through OU Libraries.

Reference & Research Guides

Overviews

Critical Editions & Facsimiles – Collections

Critical Editions & Facsimiles – Individual Authors

Disciplines & Topics

Also of note:

For more information on books and materials in the history of science, technology and medicine in the collection, see the Guide to Resources in History of Science, Technology and Medicine.  More Reference Works  More on Primary Sources

Professor Steven J.  Livesey of the Department of the History of Science has developed a database of Medieval Commentators on Aristotle and Peter Lombard’s Sentences

Visiting the History of Science Collections

While tours and class visits are not possible as we undergo renovation on the 5th floor of Bizzell Library in preparation for the Galileo’s World Exhibit (scheduled for the 2015-16 academic year), researchers continue to have individual access to our books and materials.

For a glimpse into the books in the 5th floor collections, see these guides to past exhibits: Crossing Cultures, Living Library (iBooks exhibit). Also, see our online galleries. Watch for our forthcoming post on Arabic language resources and materials for the study of the history of science, technology and medicine in Islamic cultures.

Please contact the staff for assistance (405) 325-2741. Or contact us:

See the Collections blog for more information on resources, activities, and events relating to OU’s 5th floor special collection libraries.

Posted in Class aids, Exhibits and events, Featured book, In the news, Learning resources, Manuscripts, archives, photos, Research tips, Uncategorized

Closing a Chapter on King Richard III

With King Richard III (1452-1485) finally being laid to rest, commemorations of his life are underway in Great Britain.  In recognition of these events –the latest chapter in the saga of the discovery of the King’s remains in a parking lot in Leicester — we are sharing images relating to King Richard from books held in the John and Mary Nichols Rare Books and Special Collections.

photo-48 copy 2Shown above are images relating to King Richard III, including a page from the Second Folio of William Shakespeare (1632). These were featured today on the screen in the Community Room of the Helmerich Collaborative Learning Center, in Bizzell Library at the University of Oklahoma.

Past Exhibits

Richard III, brochure

 

 

Download the guide to our February 2013 exhibit of Richard III related books, including biographies, histories of the Kings and Queens of England, and the Second Folio of William Shakespeare.

 

See the earlier posts Reprising King Richard III at OU and Richard III at OU

 

 

 

Visiting the Collections

Access to the John and Mary Nichols Collection is available to students, faculty, and other researchers. Holdings are included in the library’s online catalog. For more information, visit the Special Collections Reading Room on the 4th floor of Bizzell Memorial Library (Room 414, west side of floor; Hours: M-F 9-4pm, 325-2760).  You can also contact the Acting Curator, Dr. JoAnn Palmeri at palmerij@ou.edu or (405) 325-2741.

NOTE: Because of renovations in preparation for next year’s Galileo’s World Exhibit, the 5th floor is no longer accessible to the public. Requests for materials from the Bass Business History, Bizzell Bible, History of Science, and John and Mary Nichols Collections can be made at our new 4th floor location.

“Connections” is an ongoing theme of the upcoming Galileo’s World Exhibit. This applies to the content of the exhibit, as well as to its development and implementation: groups and individuals are collaborating across campus, across disciplines, and even across the world to bring this major exhibit to fruition, beginning in August 2015.  Last year we offered a teaser on such connections with a book display commemorating the 450 birthday of both Shakespeare and Galileo (see Shakespeare at 450)

Posted in Class aids, Exhibits and events, Featured book, In the news

Teach-In on The Western Frontier

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The Western Frontier is the theme of the 2015 University of Oklahoma Teach-In, scheduled for Monday, March 9, in Catlett Music Center and other campus locations.

For information on resources available at OU Libraries relating to the themes of the event, see the online guide Teach-In 2015: The Western Frontier.

View the display entitled The Birth and Founding of the First and Foremost National Park: Yellowstone National Park, on the 4th floor of Bizzell Library, outside of the Government Documents Collection.

 

OU’s Special Collections and the History of the American West 

The University of Oklahoma is the home of the Western History Collections, a special collection with the following mission: “Its purpose is to enhance the University Libraries general collection on the history of the American West; to support the research and teaching programs of the University of Oklahoma; and to provide opportunities for research through the acquisition, preservation, and access of materials relating to the development of the Trans-Mississippi West and Native American cultures.”

Beyond Western History, there are several other special collections on the University of Oklahoma  campus that have materials relevant to the study of American history and history of the American West. The rich and substantial holdings of the Western History Collections are supplemented by materials from Bass Business History, Bizzell Bible, History of Science, and the John and Mary Nichols Collection. Books and archival materials within these collections support a wide range of studies in 19th-century culture and American history —  science, technology, industry, commerce, religion, history, philosophy, politics, and  literature.

 

History of Science Collections:  Science, Technology, the Environment & Medicine in the American West

The History of Science Collections has a variety of primary source materials for the study of science in the 19th century: scientific journals, encyclopedias of the arts and sciences, expedition and travel accounts, treatises in botany, geography, geology, medicine, and natural history.  The following images offer a a glimpse into these materials:

 

WestBotTextSpineWesterBotanyTP

John Coulter, Text-book of western botany, consisting of Coulter’s Manual of the botany of the Rocky mountains, to which is prefixed Gray’s lessons in botany. For the use of schools and colleges between the Mississippi river and the Rocky mountains (1865 N.Y.)

 

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SteamboatExplos
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James T. Lloyd, Lloyd’s steamboat directory, and disasters on the western waters    (1856, Cincinnati)

 

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Jules Marcou, Geology of North America (Zurich, 1858)

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Howard Stansbury, An expedition to the valley of the Great Salt Lake of Utah: including a description of its geography, natural history and minerals, and an analysis of its waters (1852, Philadelphia)

 

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Othniel Charles Marsh, The dinosaurs of North America (Washington, 1896)

Resources in the History of Science, Technology, Environment, and Medicine 

In addition to rare books and primary source materials, the History of Science Collections has significant holdings in non-rare materials: modern scholarly works, critical editions and facsimiles, introductory texts, and reference books.

The following is a select list of works relevant to the study of science, technology, the environment and medicine in the American West:

For more information on books and materials in the history of science, technology and medicine in the collection, see the Guide to Resources in History of Science, Technology and Medicine.

 

Visiting the History of Science Collections

While tours and class visits are not possible as we undergo renovation on the 5th floor of Bizzell Library in preparation for the Galileo’s World Exhibit (scheduled for the 2015-16 academic year), researchers continue to have individual access to our books and materials. Please contact the staff for assistance (405) 325-2741.

For a glimpse into the books in the 5th floor collections, see these guides to past exhibits: Crossing CulturesCivil War Teach-InConstitution Day.

See the Collections blog for more information on resources, activities, and events relating to OU’s 5th floor special collection libraries. Or contact us:

Posted in Exhibits and events, In the news, Research tips, Uncategorized

Celebrating Darwin’s Birthday

In recognition of Darwin Day 2015, the annual celebration of the birthday of naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882), we invite you to learn more about books and manuscript materials by Darwin held in the History of Science Collections at the University of Oklahoma Libraries.

Below please find an overview of the Darwin Collection, previously posted on the occasion of an exhibition of Darwin First Editions: Exhibit brochure (pdf)

More than First Editions

To view all of Charles Darwin’s printed volumes in their first editions yields an unforgettable impression of the breadth and beauty of Darwin’s work. However, to support research, the Collections holds far more than just the first editions, for scholars need to see how editions of works were changed, and how translations differ. Darwinism in Germany was different than Darwinism in France or England or America, so hundreds of editions and translations have been collected. One unusual example is Darwin, Die Opshtamung fun Menschen (New York, 1926 [vol. title 1923]; The Descent of Man in Yiddish), F1139.

Darwin, Descent of Man, in Yiddish Darwin, Descent of Man, in Yiddish

Another is a Norwegian edition of Origin of Species (1890) which is not listed in the Freeman Bibliography.

Darwin, Origin of Species, in Norwegian Darwin, Origin of Species, in Norwegian Darwin, Origin of Species, in Norwegian

The Portrait collections include several depictions of Darwin, including a Darwin caricature from Vanity Fair magazine (Sept 30, 1871).

Also available in the History of Science Collections are the journals in which Darwin published his articles, the works of Darwin’s contemporaries and recent books about Darwin that support current scholarship in the history of science. With the resources of the Darwin Collection at your fingertips, the History of Science Collections of the University of Oklahoma Libraries offers an ideal place to read and study Charles Darwin.

More than Printed Works

Through making its holdings available through Landmarks of Science and various digital projects, the purpose of the History of Science Collections is to facilitate research in the University of Oklahoma Libraries and beyond.

Darwin letterThe Collections holds four handwritten Darwin letters:

  1. 1864-Feb22
  2. 1869-Jan23
  3. 1869-Oct7
  4. 1870-Feb24

The Collections are making available the enhanced ePub versions of works in the history of geology prepared by Robert Cody. So far, these ePubs include Darwin’s work on coral reefs.

OU is a major contributor to Cambridge University’s Darwin Online. Having provided digital versions of nearly 40 obscure editions, the Collections’ contribution is second only to Cambridge itself.

For more info . . .

Read more about the Galleries, browse the Darwin first editions, and view a list of additional Digitized Books.

See also the recent book Political Descent  by Dr. Piers Hale, Department of the History of Science, University of Oklahoma.

For a recap of recent Darwin commemorations at the University of Oklahoma see Darwin 2009

Posted in Digital projects, Exhibits and events, Faculty publications, This day in history, Topical Collections