Monthly Archives: March 2011

Robert Bunsen’s 200th birthday

Google’s logo on its classic search page today honors the 200th birthday of Robert Bunsen. Bunsen, whose research interests included gases, photochemistry and spectroscopy, emphasized an experimental approach. As every general chemistry student knows from their use of Bunsen burners, … Continue reading

Rate this:

Posted in Exhibits and events, This day in history | 1 Comment

Animated Anatomies at Duke University

Animated Anatomies, an exhibit curated by Valeria Finucci and Maurizio Rippa-Bonati, will open to public viewing in early April at Duke University. A companion website is now available, offering photographs and videos of these visually stunning and technically complex anatomical … Continue reading

Rate this:

Posted in Digital projects | 1 Comment

Another Baldi manuscript: The Cronica autograph

Recently we made available a manuscript of an unpublished work on sundials by Bernardino Baldi that had been missing since 1783. The OU History of Science Collections hold a second Baldi manuscript: his autograph copy of Cronica, a 16th-century history … Continue reading

Rate this:

Posted in Images recently digitized, Manuscripts, archives, photos, Recent acquisitions | 2 Comments

More than a Century of Trees

Arbor Day is March 28th! Don’t miss the exhibit in Bizzell Memorial Library, and the online exhibition: More than a Century of Trees – From David Ross Boyd to David L. Boren . “I could not visualize a treeless university … Continue reading

Rate this:

Posted in In the news

Lost manuscript on sundials

Bernardino Baldi (1553-1617), a celebrated Italian polymath, is known to have written a treatise on sun dials and timekeeping. However, this treatise was never published and, since 1783, it has been considered lost. Now we are happy to announce that … Continue reading

Rate this:

Posted in Images recently digitized, Manuscripts, archives, photos, Recent acquisitions | 2 Comments

Mars: Earliest detailed sketches

The Collections have recently acquired a rare 1666 first edition of three separately issued broadsides (foglie volante) in which Giovanni Domenico Cassini (1625-1712, also known as Jean-Dominique Cassini) reported his observations of Mars, including the first detailed sketches of its … Continue reading

Rate this:

Posted in Images recently digitized, Recent acquisitions | 1 Comment

Update: Jun Fudano and Yasu Furukawa

Update from Dr. Jun Fudano and Yasu Furukawa, OU History of Science alumni – From Yasu Furukawa: Dear Steve, Thank you for your warm note. We were shocked by the earthquake and tsunami on Friday. I was then on campus … Continue reading

Rate this:

Posted in In the news